An Age-By-Age Guide to Helping Kids Manage Emotions
We are all born with emotions, but not all those emotions are pre-wired into our brains. Kids are born with emotional reactions such as crying, frustration, hunger, and pain. But they learn about other emotions as they grow older.
There is no general consensus about the emotions that are in-built verses those learned from emotional, social, and cultural contexts. It is widely accepted, however, that the eight primary in-built emotions are anger, sadness, fear, joy, interest, surprise, disgust, and shame. These are reflected in different variations. For instance, resentment and violence often stem from anger, and anxiety is often associated with fear. Secondary emotions are always linked to these eight primary emotions and reflect our emotional reaction to specific feelings.
These emotions are learned from our experiences. For example, a child who has been punished because of a meltdown might feel anxious the next time she gets angry. A child who has been ridiculed for expressing fear might feel shame the next time he gets scared. In other words, how we react to our kids’ emotions has an impact on the development of their emotional intelligence. Emotional invalidation prevents kids from learning how to manage their emotions. When we teach kids to identify their emotions, we give them a framework that helps explain how they feel, which makes it easier for them to deal with those emotions in a socially appropriate way. The emotions children experience vary depending on age:
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Kathleen Notes: A super useful list!



- - Volume: 10 - WEEK: 24 Date: 6/9/2022 8:14:47 AM -